Tuesday, July 23, 2024

China and Russia threaten NATO: Putin crony calls for the ‘disappearance’ of Ukraine and the alliance as Beijing warns the Western military group is ‘provoking confrontation’

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China and Russia have both threatened NATO against ‘provoking confrontation’ over the bloc’s claims that Xi Jingping’s nation holds a key role in Moscow‘s invasion of Ukraine

NATO leaders said in a declaration at their summit in Washington on Wednesday that China had ‘become a decisive enabler of Russia’s war against Ukraine’, adding that Beijing‘s ‘so-called ‘no limits’ partnership’ and ‘large-scale support for Russia’s defence industrial base’ were of ‘profound concern’.

In response, a spokesperson for Beijing’s mission to the European Union said: ‘NATO should stop hyping up the so-called China threat and provoking confrontation and rivalry, and do more to contribute to world peace and stability.’

‘It is known to all that China is not the creator (of) the Ukraine crisis. China’s position on Ukraine is open and aboveboard,’ they added.

Former Russian president Dmitry Medvedev chimed in, denouncing NATO’s summit promise to grant eventual membership to Ukraine and said Russia should work towards the ‘disappearance’ of both Ukraine and the military alliance.

China and Russia have both threatened NATO against ‘provoking confrontation’ over the bloc’s claims that Xi Jingping’s nation holds a key role in Moscow ‘s invasion of Ukraine (File image) 

Ukrainian refugee Mariia Hlyten holds a sign outside the NATO summit in Washington

Ukrainian refugee Mariia Hlyten holds a sign outside the NATO summit in Washington

Ukrainian infantry fire at Russian positions on the zero line of the front in prepared trenches 100 meters from the Russian trenches on July 5, 2025 in the direction of Toretsk region

Ukrainian infantry fire at Russian positions on the zero line of the front in prepared trenches 100 meters from the Russian trenches on July 5, 2025 in the direction of Toretsk region

Former Russian president Dmitry Medvedev (pictured) denounced NATO's summit promise to grant eventual membership to Ukraine

Former Russian president Dmitry Medvedev (pictured) denounced NATO’s summit promise to grant eventual membership to Ukraine

In a social media post, Medvedev quoted in English from NATO’s declaration at its Washington summit this week: ‘We will continue to support (Ukraine) on its irreversible path to full Euro-Atlantic integration, including NATO membership.’

He went on, in Russian: ‘The conclusion is obvious. We must do everything so that Ukraine’s ‘irreversible path’ to NATO ends with either the disappearance of Ukraine or the disappearance of NATO. Or even better – the disappearance of both.’

The Russian state has backed Medvedev’s response, with Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov telling Russian news agencies today that the nation is planning ‘response measures’ to contain the “very serious threat” from NATO. 

He added that NATO was now ‘fully involved in the conflict over Ukraine.’ 

Medvedev, who during his 2008-2012 presidency was regarded as a pro-Western moderniser, has reinvented himself as an arch-hawk since the start of the war in Ukraine, something Moscow calls a ‘special military operation.’

In particular, he has repeatedly warned the U.S. and its allies that their arming of Kyiv could lead to a ‘nuclear apocalypse’.

Ukrainian infantry on the zero line of the front in prepared trenches 100 meters from the Russian trenches on July 5, 2025

Ukrainian infantry on the zero line of the front in prepared trenches 100 meters from the Russian trenches on July 5, 2025

A view of a wall mural depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin in Kostiantynivka, Ukraine on June 30, 2024

A view of a wall mural depicting Russian President Vladimir Putin in Kostiantynivka, Ukraine on June 30, 2024

A destroyed statue in Chasiv Yar, Ukraine on July 06, 2024

A destroyed statue in Chasiv Yar, Ukraine on July 06, 2024

Any decision on the use of Russian nuclear weapons would belong to President Vladimir Putin. But diplomats say the views of Medvedev, who is deputy chairman of Russia’s Security Council, give an indication of hawkish thinking at the top of the Kremlin which has cast the war as an existential struggle with the West. 

China has refused to condemn Russia’s invasion and last year released a paper calling for a ‘political settlement’ to the conflict, which Western countries said could enable Russia to retain much of the territory it has seized in Ukraine.

China and Russia’s strategic partnership has grown closer since the invasion.

Beijing presents itself as a neutral party in the war and says it is not sending lethal assistance to either side, unlike the United States and other Western nations.

It has however offered a critical lifeline to Russia’s isolated economy, with trade booming since the conflict began.

But that economic partnership has come under close scrutiny from the West in recent months, with Washington vowing to go after financial institutions that facilitate Moscow’s war effort.

A view of a destroyed tank at the town of New York (Niu-York) as Torecki has so far been one of the quietest sections of the front line

A view of a destroyed tank at the town of New York (Niu-York) as Torecki has so far been one of the quietest sections of the front line

A view of a collapsed building at the town of New York (Niu-York) as Torecki has so far been one of the quietest sections of the front line as the Russians started shelling the area

A view of a collapsed building at the town of New York (Niu-York) as Torecki has so far been one of the quietest sections of the front line as the Russians started shelling the area

The United States and Europe have also accused Beijing of selling components and equipment necessary to keep Moscow’s military production afloat.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in April this included ‘machine tools, semiconductors, other dual-use items that have helped Russia rebuild the defence industrial base that sanctions and export controls had done so much to degrade’.

Beijing has denied claims it is aiding Russia’s fighting in Ukraine and insisted it won’t accept ‘criticism or pressure’ over its ties with Moscow.

And on Thursday, its foreign ministry accused the alliance of ‘prejudice, smearing and provocation’.

‘NATO’s rhetoric about China’s responsibility in Ukraine is unjustified and malicious,’ spokesman Lin Jian said.

‘We urge NATO to reflect on the root causes of the crisis and its own actions, listen carefully to the just voice of the international community, and take concrete actions to ease the situation, instead of shifting the blame to others.’

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